Nordic Lodge February meeting to feature flag history

At the February 19th meeting of the Whidbey Island Nordic Lodge, guest speaker Nancy Bolin-Romanski will portray Mary Pickersgill, the woman who created the American flag that flew over Ft. McHenry – The Star Spangled Banner.  Following Nancy’s presentation Lodge member  Dick Johnson will discuss the evolution of our Scandinavian flags.

In the summer of 1813, Mary Pickersgill (1776–1857) was contracted to sew two flags for Fort McHenry in Baltimore, Maryland. The one that became the Star-Spangled Banner was a 30 x 42–foot garrison flag; the other was a 17 x 25–foot storm flag for use in inclement weather. Pickersgill, a thirty-seven-year-old widow, was an experienced maker of ships’ colors and signal flags. She filled orders for many of the military and merchant ships that sailed into Baltimore’s busy port.

Helping Pickersgill make the flags were her thirteen-year-old daughter Caroline; nieces Eliza Young (thirteen) and Margaret Young (fifteen); and a thirteen-year-old African American indentured servant, Grace Wisher. Pickersgill’s elderly mother, Rebecca Young, from whom she had learned flagmaking, may have helped as well.

Pickersgill and her assistants spent about seven weeks making the two flags. They assembled the blue canton and the red and white stripes of the flag by piecing together strips of loosely woven English wool bunting that were only 12 or 18 inches wide.

The meeting will begin at 10:00 am and is open to the public.

 

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